Mother’s Day

We had a good visit with Phil’s parents, and a very good turkey dinner. Glazed shallots as well…one of my favourites. :)

This photo is of the old school next to the stable; we have to walk down the lane behind it to get to the pastures. It’s a beautiful Victorian house, which is evidently the third Hall; the second was a black-and-white Tudor-style, and I’m not sure what the original Hall looked like. It’s gorgeous.

I love it so here. I never use the word “quaint,” because it seems condescending, but when you grow up with trailer parks buildings like this are pretty impressive. :)

Gorgeous morning, with crap weather following on for the afternoon. I went to lunge Kip in the outdoor arena during a break in the rain, and we were fine for about ten minutes. Then the heavens opened again and dumped sleet and rain on us. Kip stopped, straddle-legged, and his head drooped down between his front legs; he stood there as if he had suddenly lost his will to live. I was laughing hard enough to split my sides, but I had to take pity on him and give up. I swear this horse was Laurence Olivier in a past life. He’s a hell of an actor.

To show that horse and rider are beginning their training on correct classical lines. They are establishing the first of the Scales of Training with the emphasis on Rhythm, Suppleness and Contact.

The Rider
-Has a balanced upright position
-Is supple and able to follow the movement of the horse
-Maintains a light elastic contact with the horse’s mouth
-Applies clear aids effectively without unnecessary movement.

The Horse
-Has regular, pure unhurried paces
-Shows rideability and is obedient to the aids of the rider
-Accepts a contact with the bit without resistance and tension
-Moves willingly forward with active hindquarters
-Remains reasonably straight so that his body is aligned along the curve of a circle or turn, or on a straight line. Momentary losses of straightness or quarters very slightly in are not serious faults at this early stage.
-Transitions are smooth and although best if executed at the marker more weight is given to their correctness than to their accuracy.

The Movements
-Halt
-Free walk on long rein
-Medium walk
-Working trot and canter
-20 metre circles in working trot and canter
-Serpentine which consists of half circles connected by a straight line. When crossing the centre line the horse should be parallel to the short side. There should be clear changes of direction as described below in the loops.
-Transitions that may be progressive so that when coming to a halt from the trot a few steps of walk may be shown.
-5 metre loops when the horse moves off the track to reach an apex 5 metres away from the track, show a clear change of bend and then return to the track to show another change of bend when reaching it. At these changes of direction the horse should adjust the bend of his body to the curvature of the line he follows, remaining supple and following the indications of the rider, without any resistance or change of pace, rhythm or speed.
-Trot work may be rising or sitting (woo hoo!)

Doesn’t seem very scary. I think some baby shows may be in store for us this summer. :)



4 thoughts on “Mother’s Day”

  • I think I could live in that building, why yes :-) Very very nice indeed. You have such beauty all around you, lucky lucky.

  • Your entries about Kip always make me laugh, he sounds like a real character..I can almost see his facial expressions, you describe him so well. I love the look of that house, it is beautiful,there are quite a few pretty buildings in my village. Here is a link for the village I live in. Porch house is my next door neighbour, unfortunately my house is nothing like as grand:) Not that I mind..less housework with a small house.

  • Kip has a lot of personality for just one horse. ;) Porch house is gorgeous. I agree, though – smaller houses require less housework, and as much as I love the very old houses, there’s a lot to be said for double glazing.

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